Monthly Archives: June 2009

Strength in Numbers

HUNGER IS A REAL PROBLEM IN THE US. 12.4 MILLION CHILDREN ARE AT RISK OF HUNGER IN AMERICA — THAT’S 1 IN 6. TOGETHER, WE CAN PUT AN END TO THIS

Vodpod videos no longer available.

more about "Strength in Numbers", posted with vodpod

Leave a comment

Filed under Advocacy, FamilyWorks News, FamilyWorks' Community, Hunger & Food Security, Parenting, Parents of School-Aged Children (5-12), Parents of Young Children (Ages 0-5), Poverty, Teen and Young Parents

Summer Hunger in Montgomery County – washingtonpost.com

 

  Another article highlights the issue of hunger and children in the summers. This comments that Montgomery County reaches 86% of eligible students with its summer program, while the national average is 18%. 18% is abominable, but even 86% means that many children are going hungry in the summer….

 

 

‘Hunger Doesn’t Take a Summer Break’ – washingtonpost.com

.

1 Comment

Filed under Advocacy, FamilyWorks News, FamilyWorks' Community, Hunger & Food Security, Parenting, Parents of School-Aged Children (5-12), Parents of Young Children (Ages 0-5), Poverty, Teen and Young Parents

Welfare Sees Sharp Increase – WSJ.com

Despite a recent history of constant welfare numbers and even declines in some states, the flailing economy has finally resulted in a sharp increase in welfare numbers, according to the Wall Street Journal. Washington State is in the category of greatest percentage increase.[Welfare States]

Numbers On Welfare See Sharp Increase – WSJ.com.

Leave a comment

Filed under Advocacy, FamilyWorks News, FamilyWorks' Community, Food Bank, Fundraisers, Hunger & Food Security, Just for Fun, Parenting, Parents of School-Aged Children (5-12), Parents of Young Children (Ages 0-5), Poverty, Teen and Young Parents, Uncategorized

Bringing the People Behind Our Food to Life

In part 1, Ken Meter, of Crossroads Resource Center, defines what constitutes a strong local food economy, and how farming has evolved since the 1930’s. Meter, a consultant who specializes in helping strengthen local communities, says more people want to know where their food comes from, and how it’s produced. Industrialization of the food system, and the problems of food safety, and a long list of other problems has reinvigorated communities across America to evaluate how they may build and promote their own local food economies. The benefits can be substantial to the local environment, local economy, and culture.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

Leave a comment

Filed under Advocacy, FamilyWorks' Community, Food Bank, Hunger & Food Security, Poverty

Chefs Changing Lives with Food – NYTimes.com

Highly-trained chefs are giving up high-paying careers serving the wealthy in order to work in shelters and addiction programs, teaching the skills of the kitchen and of life to people who need it most. This reminds FamilyWorks of our local version: FareStart. Check it out and support the recovery, job skills training, and delicious food they have to offer!

 


 

 

 

American Album – Finding Purpose in Serving the Needy, Not Just Haute Cuisine – NYTimes.com.

Leave a comment

Filed under Advocacy, Hunger & Food Security, Poverty

Beyonce Teams up with Feeding America

See how Beyonce is helping fight hunger – and join the cause if you can!

Show Your Helping Hand .

Leave a comment

Filed under Advocacy, Food Bank, Fundraisers, Hunger & Food Security

CDC Guidelines for Healthy Youth

CDC addresses six critical types of adolescent health behavior that research shows contribute to the leading causes of death and disability among adults and youth. Other important issues that affect children and adolescents are also addressed.

Six Critical Health Behaviors

  1. Alcohol & Drug Use
    Alcohol is used by more young people in the United States than tobacco or illicit drugs, and is a factor in approximately 41% of all deaths from motor vehicle crashes.
  2. Injury & Violence (including suicide)
    Injury and violence is the leading cause of death among youth aged 10-24 years: motor vehicle crashes (30% of all deaths), all other unintentional injuries (15%), homicide (15%), and suicide (12%).
  3. Tobacco Use
    Each day in the United States, approximately 4,000 adolescents aged 12-17 try their first cigarette. Each year cigarette smoking accounts for approximately 1 of every 5 deaths, or about 438,000 people. Cigarette smoking results in 5.5 million years of potential life lost in the United States annually.
  4. Nutrition
    Healthy eating is associated with reduced risk for many diseases, including the three leading causes of death: heart disease, cancer, and stroke. In 2007, only 21.4% of high school students reported eating fruits and vegetables five or more times daily (when fried potatoes and potato chips are excluded) during the past 7 days.
  5. Physical Activity
    Participation in physical activity declines as children get older. Overall, in 2007, 35% of 9-12 graders had participated in at least 60 minutes per day of physical activity. 
  6. Sexual Risk Behaviors
    Each year, there are approximately 19 million new STD infections in the United States, and almost half of them are among youth aged 15 to 24. In 2007, 39% of currently sexually active high school students did not use a condom during last sexual intercourse.

These behaviors usually are established during childhood, persist into adulthood, are inter-related, and are preventable. In addition to causing serious health problems, these behaviors also contribute to the educational and social problems that confront the nation, including failure to complete high school, unemployment, and crime.

Back to Top

Other Important Health Topics

Adolescent Health
During the transition from childhood to adulthood, adolescents establish patterns of behavior and make lifestyle choices that affect both their current and future health.

Asthma
On average, in a classroom of 30 children, about three are likely to have asthma. About 5.6 million school-aged children and youth are reported to currently have asthma, and asthma is one of the leading causes of school absenteeism.

Childhood Obesity
The prevalence of obesity among children ages 6 to 11 has more than doubled in the past 20 years, going from 6.5% in 1980 to 17.0% in 2006. Several chronic disease risk factors are related to childhood overweight and obesity, including high blood pressure and high cholesterol. Additionally, obese young people have a great likelihood of becoming obese adults and developing diseases associated with adulthood, such as type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

Crisis Preparedness & Response
Preparation is the responsibility of every school, community, and state. Should an event or threat occur or be suspected, every staff member should know how to respond based on protocols or community-based plans established in advance in collaboration with public health and first responder agencies.

Food Allergies
Food allergies are an abnormal immune response to certain foods that the body reacts to as harmful. Each year food allergies cause 30,000 cases of anaphylaxis, 2,000 hospitalizations, and 150 deaths. The best method for managing food allergies is prevention by avoiding any foods that trigger a reaction.

Food Safety
Educating students, families, and school staff on simple but effective food safety measures can help prevent the approximately 76 million cases of foodborne illness that are reported in the United States annually, resulting in an average of 325,000 hospitalizations and 5,000 deaths. Food safety is especially important in schools, because each day more than 27 million children get their lunch through the National School Lunch Program. Furthermore, educating students in school about food safety can help them build good food safety habits that last a lifetime.

Health Disparities
In the United States different racial and ethnic populations, as well as sexual minority populations, suffer disproportionately from preventable diseases and conditions, many of which result from health-related behaviors that are established during childhood and adolescence.

Mental Health
Mental health is an under-recognized serious health problem. An estimated 21% of young people in the United States between the ages 9 and 17 have diagnosable emotional or behavioral health disorders, but less than a third get help for these problems.

Noise-Induced Hearing Loss
Hearing loss can result from damage to structures and/or nerve fibers in the inner ear that respond to sound. This type of hearing loss, termed “noise-induced hearing loss,” is usually caused by exposure to excessively loud sounds and cannot be medically or surgically corrected. An estimated 12.5% of children and adolescents aged 6-19 years (approximately 5.2 million) and 17% of adults aged 20-69 years (approximately 26 million) have suffered permanent damage to their hearing from excessive exposure to noise.

Skin Cancer
The most common form of cancer in the United States is skin cancer. Skin cancer is a preventable disease, as exposure to the sun’s ultraviolet rays appears to be the most important environmental factor. Schools are in a good position to encourage children to develop sun protection habits.

Related Resources

Registries of Effective Programs lists federally-sponsored registries that include programs with evidence of effectiveness in reducing youth risk behaviors.

Sleep and Sleep Disorders This site provides information regarding sleep disorders, the relationship between sleep and chronic disease, injury, and other health outcomes; sleep time recommendations; links to national sleep organizations; and additional resources.

Steps to a HealthierUS is an initiative from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) that advances the goal of helping Americans live longer, better, and healthier lives. The Steps Cooperative Agreement Program funds 40 communities nationwide to implement school and other community-based programs that address obesity, diabetes, and asthma, as well as their related risk behaviors: physical inactivity, poor nutrition, and tobacco use.

Leave a comment

Filed under Hunger & Food Security, Parenting, Parents of School-Aged Children (5-12), Parents of Young Children (Ages 0-5), Poverty, Teen and Young Parents

More Info About Express Credit Union

We’ve noticed that many people are Googling Express Credit Union and ending up on our welcome post. So I asked ECU for some more information, and here is what they sent:

ECU exists to: “Provide affordable financial services to low & moderate income people in King County. In doing so, help them build assets and achieve financial stability.” In King County approximately 56,000 households live at or below poverty income levels. This population is often un-/under-banked and frequently become entangled in the difficult, costly, ongoing payday lending cycle. ECU empowers people with their own financial resources by providing accessible and affordable alternatives to break out of this cycle.

ECU partners with local community social service agencies to provided financial services and advice to their clients. Our goal is to help low income individuals and families out of the cycle of predatory lending, while also providing them with financial literacy and education.

ECU’s role is to serve as facilitators and conduits between ECU and the clients served by our partners, providing information, credit union services, and loan alternatives.

For more information, see the articles about ECU in The Seattle Times, Real Change, or The Puget Sound Business Journal.

ECU currently has Community Member Service Representatives available at the following times and locations:

Community Member Service Representative Agency Schedule

CMSR #1 Samuel Gebremedhin 206  554-1534

Day

Agency

Address

City

Time

Monday

YWCA Greenbridge

8th Ave. SW and SW 96th St

White Center

10AM to 4PM

Tuesday

Neighborhood House High Point:

6558 35th Ave. S.W

Seattle

10AM to 4PM

Wednesday

ReWa Main Office 

4008 MLK JR. Way, S

Seattle

10AM to 4PM

Thursday

Neighborhood House Rainier Vista

4410 29th Ave. S

Seattle

10AM to 4PM

Friday

ReWA South King County Office

15245 International Boulevard, Suite 207

Sea Tac

10AM to 4PM

CMSR #2 Hannah Haag (206) 529-7937

Day

Agency

Address

City

Time

Monday

Solid Ground Main Office

1501 N 45th Street

Seattle

10AM to 4PM

Tuesday

Solid Ground Sand Point Housing

7400 Sand Point Way NE

Seattle

10AM to 4PM

Wednesday

Hopelink Shoreline Center

15809 Westminster Way N.

Shoreline 

10AM to 4PM

Thursday

Hopelink Bellevue Main Office

14812 Main St.

Bellevue

10AM to 4PM

Friday

New Futures Vintage Park

13737 12th Ave SW.  Building 31

Burien

12PM to 6PM

CMSR #3 Maricel Valdez (206) 607-7510

Day

Agency

Address

City

Time

Monday

Catholic Community Services

1229 Smith Street

Kent

10AM to 4PM

Tuesday

Neigbhorhood House New Holly

7054 32nd Ave. S

Seattle

10AM to 4PM

Wednesday

Multi-Service Center Kent Office

515 W. Harrison Street

Kent

10AM to 4PM

Thursday

Neigborhood House Yesler Terrace

825 Yesler Way

Seattle

10AM to 4PM

Friday

Multi-Service Center Main Office

1200 S. 336th St.

Federal Way

10AM to 4PM

CMSR # 4 Nathan Hawkins 206 992-1720

Tuesday

YWCA Opportunity Place

2024 Third Avenue

Seattle

9AM to 4PM

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Advocacy, FamilyWorks News, FamilyWorks' Community, Poverty

Happy Father’s Day!

Here is a suggestion for a gift for the fathers in your life on Father’s Day. Click on the photo or the link below to hear one blogger’s idea of how to create family bonds, give back, and make your father (and yourself) feel worthwhile. Please call FamilyWorks if you are interested in volunteering with us!

Father’s Day: Forget the wallet and BBQ pit this year. Give back. We can help. « Capital Area Food Bank of Texas Blog.

Leave a comment

Filed under Advocacy, Food Bank

Diaper Drive – On NOW!

FamilyWorks’ Young Parents Group is putting on a diaper drive in front of the Wallingford QFC right now! On your way to the Solstice Parade and the Fremont Fair, please stop by, say hi, and donate some diapers or baby food if you can. Thanks for your support!

Leave a comment

Filed under Advocacy, FamilyWorks News, FamilyWorks' Community, Food Bank, Fundraisers, Hunger & Food Security, Just for Fun, Parenting, Parents of School-Aged Children (5-12), Parents of Young Children (Ages 0-5), Poverty, Teen and Young Parents, Uncategorized