Category Archives: Parenting

Get Ready for the 61st Annual Wallingford Seafair Kiddies Parade!

Save the date for the Kiddies Parade and stop by the FamilyWorks table!

Wallingford Seafair Kiddies Parade & Street Fair
Saturday, July 10, 2010
Parade at 11 AM (on N 45th St)
Street Fair 10-5 PM (on Wallingford Ave)

Wallingford holds the longest continuous running Kiddies Parade in Seattle (since 1949!).  The 61st Annual Wallingford Seafair Kiddies Parade is a Seafair Sanctioned Community event designed for children young or old.  Families, groups and individuals are invited to participate.  All children are invited to march in the parade!  Family groups do not need to fill in an application, just come to the check-in tent (see map) .  Dressing in costume is encouraged, but not required. Just show up and register.  Drill Teams and vehicles must fill out an application and send it in by June 15th.  Join the Seafair clowns, various bands, pirates, fire trucks, and much more in a fun parade, then stop by the Wallingford Street fair for more fun, food, kids activities and rides.

Download:   Parade Application    Parade Rules    Parade Map

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Filed under FamilyWorks Staff & Volunteers, FamilyWorks' Community, Fundraisers, Just for Fun, Parenting

11 ways to show love for your child

Eleven ways to show love for your child – Corpus Christi, TX | KRISTV.COM

One NBC Affiliate suggests 11 ways to show your love for your child. What do you think of them? Do you agree or disagree? Do you have things you’d add?

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1. Start early. Before your child is born, avoid alcohol and drugs, limit or avoid caffeine and don’t smoke. Get good prenatal care so your child has the best chance at a healthy life.

2. Read to your child. Even babies like to be read to, and children of all ages benefit from a love of reading. When your child is old enough, take turns reading to each other.

3. Use positive words. Encourage your child with phrases such as “You can do it!” and “Great job!” Nurture self-confidence by praising efforts and accomplishments.

4. Provide structure. Set clear rules and stick to them. Limit the kind and amount of television your child watches. Have meals at regular times, and have a schedule for homework and bedtime.

5. Protect your child’s health. Make sure all immunizations are up to date. See the doctor for regular well-child visits. Make sure your child gets enough sleep. Encourage physical activity, and offer healthy foods and snacks.

6. Make your home safe. Keep medicines, cleaning supplies, sharp objects and other hazards locked up and out of reach. Keep small objects away from children 3 years old and younger to prevent choking.

7. Practice car safety. Put infants and children younger than 12 in the back seat of the car. Be sure your child’s safety seat is installed properly. Insist that your older child buckle up just like you do.

8. Monitor your child. Early on, take care to choose good child care providers. Later, know your child’s friends and teachers. Know where your child spends time and what he or she is doing.

9. Be a good role model. Set an example by using words like “I’m sorry,” “please” and “thank you.” Avoid name-calling or hurtful words, even when you’re angry or frustrated. Don’t hold grudges.

10. Spend time with your child. Your time is one of the greatest gifts you can give. Do fun things you both enjoy, like going to the park or playing games. Involve your child in household tasks you can do together, like cooking. Ask your child about his or her life and really listen.

11. Show and tell. Give plenty of hugs and kisses. And say “I love you” often.

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U.S. Kids’ Well-Being Lags

Last week’s article showcases key points that suggest that while some trends are improving, other measures of kids’ well-being are worsening as compared to the 2000 census, e.g. teen births, which are dramatically increasing. Interestingly, one of t he key measurements the article points to as showing a decline in well-being is an increase in the number of children living in single-parent households. This seems more judgemental as a measurement tool than, say, low-birth-weight, which has specific medical conditions associated with it. We at FamilyWorks value single parents and have seen many a wonderful family headed by one parent instead of two. What do you think of the government’s use of the controversial statistic in this way? What do you think about the other statistics the study uses to measure child well-being, and the assumptions behind them?

Full Article (click below):

U.S. Kids’ Well-Being Lags in Key Areas – CBS News.

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Filed under Advocacy, Parenting, Single Parent, Teen and Young Parents

Capa de Cuentos

According to the library’s online description, “Los Nietos presents a bilingual series of short Latin American stories, along with live music, ancient history, shadow puppets and traditional costumes. For ages 3-adult.” That brief description does not do justice to the animated songs, tales, poignancy, and audience participation that took place in the meeting room of the High Point Branch of the Seattle Public Library today.

Starring FamilyWorks’ very own Mayra Castanos, cast as a child who is sad because she misses her deceased grandfather, and is looking for his soul, a cast of three acted, danced, sang, and fielded questions and interruptions from the most demanding of audiences: children. A small row of seats lined the back of the room, and the rest of the space was filled with carpet squares for little ones of all ages. As Mayra worked her way through tales with morals like our hearts can see things that our eyes cannot, she was greeted by two wizards and three people wearing capes, each of whom had a story to tell. Layers upon layers of stories included marionettes (the horse was a crowd favorite), shadow puppets (including a multicolored, jointed lizard), and music. There were songs, there was dance, and there were questions asked. The children excitedly help Mayra find each of the people wearing capes, informed her that they spoke English, and told stories of their own great-grandparents.

Unlike so many children’s plays, even those of us who were there to support friends rather than bring our own small children learned from the play. Immersed in a society in which talk of death and dying are almost taboo, we were reminded of the importance of remembering the dead while celebrating life, of remembering that we know the sun is there even on days when we can’t see it, and of keeping the memories of those we love alive. While the children mostly wanted to share their own experiences during the question and answer session following the play, more than a few adults had questions about Day of the Dead, about altars, and about remembrance.

Admittedly, this particular show occurred on one of the hottest days of Seattle’s latest heat waves, in the overly-air-conditioned Seattle Public Library, but even if it’s a gorgeous and not oppressively-warm day, this play is a great way to spend an hour of your afternoon, and to provoke thought and discussion about death, dying, and life. There are plenty more dates at various branches of the library in which to see Capa de Cuentos. Congratulations to Mayra and Los Nietos for bringing such an important topic to life, and for inspiring the children, who all rushed to help move a table on the set and find boxes for the altar!

We highly recommend checking out the Seattle Public Library and its Summer Reading Program (for both kids and adults). For all the photos and even a VIDEO from the event, please check out our Facebook Page!

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Filed under FamilyWorks Staff & Volunteers, FamilyWorks' Community, Parenting, Parents of School-Aged Children (5-12), Parents of Young Children (Ages 0-5), Single Parent

How To Behave In A Restaurant (not!) | Jannie Funster

Ever felt like you’re alone when your children decide to act out in public? These photos should help you realize you’re not (more on the blog linked below).

How To Behave In A Restaurant (not!) | Jannie Funster.

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Filed under Just for Fun, Parenting, Parents of School-Aged Children (5-12), Parents of Young Children (Ages 0-5), Teen and Young Parents

Jane Fonda: Community-Based Doulas: A Good Investment in the Future

This movie and article showcase the potential societal gains from connecting teen and young parents with doulas, who often act as parenting coaches throughout the first year or two of the child’s life. Jane Fonda comments and argues that doulas should be part of the WIC program.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

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Filed under Advocacy, Parenting, Parents of School-Aged Children (5-12), Parents of Young Children (Ages 0-5), Poverty, Teen and Young Parents

Homelessness Suburbanizes

End Homelessness – Change.org: Suburban, Rural Homelessness Jumps in 2008.

Statistics show near stability in total homelessness, but an increase in suburban/rural homelessness. Worse yet, the number of homeless families increased by 9%.

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Filed under Advocacy, FamilyWorks News, FamilyWorks' Community, Food Bank, Fundraisers, Hunger & Food Security, Just for Fun, Parenting, Parents of School-Aged Children (5-12), Parents of Young Children (Ages 0-5), Poverty, Teen and Young Parents, Uncategorized